Best Putter for Bad Putters


You can’t score well if you can’t putt!

I hate to be harsh, but it’s a simple truth. But, I’m guessing you already knew that.

Did you know the average number of putts (by the best in the game) is about 28 hits per round? The average score is a little under 70. So, if approximately 28 of those 70 hits are putts, then 40% of their score comes from putting. And this is the professionals we’re talking about. For the rest of us, the average number of putts is 35. The exact percentage will change based on your score, but it’s easy to see that putting is critical to a low score.

In this post, I’m going to discuss types of putter heads, the two putting strokes, and which putters are best for beginners.

If there is one area where we could all make a significant dent in our game, it’s putting. We use the putter more than any other club in the bag, so if there’s a club we want to be comfortable with, it’s the putter.

If you’re a high handicapper or beginner, there’s a good chance, you’re three-putting. And this kills your score, not to mention incredibly frustrating. Reducing your three-putting and increase your one-putt successes, will surely help you break the 90’s or possibly the 80’s.

Types of Putter Heads

The best putter for the average golfer is going to be the one that you’re most comfortable and consistent with. That being said, there are two main types of putter heads to choose from, the blade and mallet putter.

Blade Putter

With a blade putter, the shaft connects either close to the heel or possibly the middle of the head. It’s typically used by putters that prefer an arc in their putt. While both the mallet and blade putter typically weigh the same, the blade putter is generally easier to maneuver, that’s typically done with the arc swing. Some would say they require a soft touch and are preferred by those that appreciate a simple putter.

Mallet Putter

The mallet putter is a bit more sophisticated than the blade putter. They are notable by their larger clubhead, which comes in various sizes and shapes. A large portion of the weight is away from the face of the club, giving it a different feel when used. Those that prefer the straight back, straight forward swing, like this style because the center of gravity is toward the rear of the club, making it easier to keep square.

In recent years, they’ve introduced a mind-boggling array of putters. Some are sleek and narrow, while others look like sophisticated gadgets. Whether you’re a “straight back and straight through” putter or an arc putter will help determine which is best for you. Overall, below is a list of the best putters for beginners.

Long Putters vs Belly Putters

Long putters range from 46-50 inches long and up. The advantage of the long putter is, it removes any wrist action. With the anchor hand it holds the club to your chest while your opposite simply guides or barely touches the club. Some say the long putter is easy on the nerves, which makes it very appealing who tend to get into their own head.

The Belly putters are usually 40-45 inches long and are anchored around the navel. If you’re struggling with too much wrist action, the anchor serves as a point of contact reducing wrist movement. Caution, as of January 1, 2016 anchoring putters to your body isn’t allowed, but the putter itself remains legal.

When possible I try to include a couple different vendors so you can get the best deal available!

Best Putter for Bad Putters

1) Odyssey White Hot Pro 2.0 PutterOpens in a new tab. – the Odyssey putter line is always near the top for best all-around putters. This timeless blade putter features a re-engineered white-hot face insert designed to improve the sound, feel, and performance. Heel/toe weight placement combines with a full-shaft offset and crank neck hosel to maximize feel, alignment, and accuracy. If your swing is closer to an arc vs the “straight back straight forward” swing, this could be the choice for you. The reviews on this one make it sound like a magical club, and scores are dropping like flies.

Callaway Odyssey White Hot Pro 2.0 Black #1 Putter (Right Hand, Steel, #1, Standard Grip, 35' Length)Opens in a new tab.

2) Pinemeadow Golf Site 4 PutterOpens in a new tab. – next on the list is a Pinemeadow, and I’m surprised I don’t see it recommended more often. For the price, I find it very affordable for a beginner or mid to high handicapper. It’s obviously not a big name brand (thought quickly becoming one), but Pinemeadow has done a great job of putting out a quality putter without having to attach a brand name price tag to it. Current users are turning their 3-putts into 2-putts and the 2-putts are tap ins. It features a low center of gravity helping you maintain a smooth stroke throughout your swing. With this putter expect to make more putts from all distances.

Pinemeadow Golf Site 4 Putter (Men's, Right Hand)Opens in a new tab.

3) S7K Standing PutterOpens in a new tab. – you may have heard or seen people using the S7K on the course already. It literally stands up on its own, so you can perfect your alignment. It eliminates the potential for bad wrist action, by standing on its own. The perfect alignment technology they have with this does come at a price. If your comfortable with distance, but really struggle with the aim, this putter might be worth its weight in gold.

S7K Standing Putter for Men and Women –Stand Up Golf Putter for Perfect Alignment –Legal for Tournament Play –Eliminate 3-Putts (Right)Opens in a new tab.

4) Wilson Harmonized M PutterOpens in a new tab. – Wilson has put out an affordable putter that I can get behind. Wilson manufactures both mallet and blade putters, but this Harmonized putter is great for beginners. The Horizontal lines on the putter head visually support alignment for a more accurate setup. The grip features a vertical seam on the backside to improve feel throughout the stroke. For the price, this one is a winner.

Wilson Staff Harmonized Putter, Men's M5, Right HandOpens in a new tab.

5) Cleveland Golf 2019 Huntington Beach SOFT Putter #11Opens in a new tab. – so Cleveland makes both mallet and blade putters, similarly to other big-name brands. This mallet putter #11 comes with an oversized grip and a moderate toe hang for mid to high arch swings. Cleveland does an excellent job with quality to price ratio. Available in 3 different lengths, one is destined to be in your bag. No matter you prefer a blade or a mallet, Cleveland has you covered.

Cleveland Golf Huntington Beach SOFT Putter #11 35", Right Hand

Conclusion of Best Putter for Bad Putters

Obviously, your putter can make or break your score. Good putting takes practiceOpens in a new tab., and then a bit more practice after that. If close to half of the strokes are in putts, it makes sense to get a putter you’re comfortable with and spend some quality time using it. I hope one of the aforementioned putters works for you or at least points you in the right direction. Remember: a putt counts the same on the scorecard as a massive drive down the middle.

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